Recruitment and Onboarding Part 2


 
The process of onboarding is crucial and measures to retain employees are being given increased focus. A measure taken to retain employees is to provide a good and substantial onboarding experience. Retention of employees begins at day one, it is also your ‘first impression’ of the organisation… Don’t you want to give new employees a good first impression?
 
Benefits of a good onboarding process in place:
 

  • Increased productivity and motivation from day one
  • Eliminates the feeling of being ‘lost’ as a new person
  • The employee has an idea of what the organisation is about, who they need to report to and who are the employees at management level

 

 
In KALES, successful candidates who have accepted an offer will be inducted into the organization via the process of Onboarding. Tasks that are carried out during this stage are grouped under Perform Applicant Onboarding activity. These tasks include any details relating to medical tests, reference data and joining formalities.
 
Why is KALES better than other systems? KALES self-service aspect of onboarding is paperless and ensures integration and structure in induction. Candidates are able to see what forms need to be submitted, what documents are mandatory/non-mandatory and what percentage of tasks are pending. During the export to HRMS process (Process of candidate to employee), all the information that a candidate has entered under the ‘Personal Information’ section is copied to HRMS and available for further editing and viewing by the employee.
 

Forms/documents:

This is where the employee will upload relevant qualification/education documents and download templates for forms that need to be submitted for their job.
 

Agreements/Policies:

Under this section, the employee can download the agreements/policies and provide their acceptance by clicking the ‘I Agree’ button.
 

Training courses:

This section is only applicable for an employee that needs to complete specific training for the job as part of their onboarding process. The status of the training would be displayed next to the training course eg. Not Completed or Completed or In Progress
 

 
The onboarding portal also helps employees understand where their work location is, who their supervisor is and who is part of their team. This way they can identify key employees before commencing on their first day.
 

 
Louise
KALES Consultant

This entry was posted on June 6th, 2017.

Recruitment and Onboarding Part 1


Have you applied for a job and have you just been overwhelmed with copious amounts of paper work? With KALES, recruitment and onboarding is a paperless system.
 
Recruitment is the process of finding and hiring the best candidate from within or outside of the organisation for a vacancy, in a timely and effective manner. The recruitment process includes defining requirements of a job, allowing applicants to apply for that job, screening and selecting applicants, hiring and inducting the new employee into the organisation.
 
KALES Recruitment enables a full range of hiring activity – from raising a hire request to onboarding the applicant, with ease of access and power packed features. It comes with in-built UIs and mobility features that enrich the user experience. KALES Recruitment can be easily integrated with external job-sites and social network websites to publish vacancies and receive resumes.
 

Details and features of recruitment

Request for Hire (RFH)

Captures key specifics on a hiring request. Details include position for which the request is made, department, grade set, grade, number required, required by date and many more. A manager may also place a ‘quick request’ which requires inputting the most relevant information in a timely fashion.
 

 

Sourcing Strategy

Here we can see details such as candidate sourcing, alert frequency, selection stages and assessment mode that defines a broad level plan for the RFH that is laid out. Applicants can be either internal or external. Candidate sourcing can be further identified by a sourcing channel, for example, if it’s an external candidate, the sourcing channel can be a career website, job portal or staffing agency. This can be defined in the sourcing strategy.
 

Applicant Profile

Candidates create their profiles whilst applying for a vacant position. This is created using a unique ID and enables the candidate to input details such as personal information, education, work experience and competencies. Candidates may also sign in with LinkedIn to input all their information.
 

Screening and Shortlisting

This stage is performed at a RFH level. All profiles can be screened to filter and shortlist those suitable. Profiles received internally or externally can be fetched for screening aimed at a particular RFH. In addition, there are other methods available for screening such as RFH criteria based, keyword search and competency profiling. The user can perform normal screening, incremental screening and override screening.
 

Applicant Assessment

Applicants are evaluated in all selection stages identified for the RFH. Assessment can be done by individual members or a panel. Applicants will be assessed based on the rating set identified for the particular stage of the RFH. Details captured in assessing applicants are RFH details, stage to assess, assessment based on, rating set details, user rating, RFH competencies assessment and proficiency level assessment.
 

Applicant Selection and Offer

Applicants are selected based on their performance in the selection stages. An offer can be made to the top performers, based on the ranking. An offer can be made based on the remuneration fitment and other job details such as position, job, grade set and grade. An applicant can accept or reject an offer. Multiple offers can be created and tracked.
 

Applicant Induction

Selected applicants are finally inducted into the organisation. Key information of the applicant is captured that form the basis for carrying out the joining formalities.
More detail on this will be discussed in my next blog on Onboarding!
 
Louise
KALES Consultant

This entry was posted on June 1st, 2017.

KALES ESS

kales
As seen in our previous blogs, KALES is delivered via a smooth and impressive UI. A prominent feature is Employee Self Service (ESS).
 

 
The ability for employees to use the ‘self-service’ feature is vital for the everyday operational activities of an organisation.
 
Why is employee self-service a good feature? It:

  • promotes efficiency and effectiveness
  • assists employee’s in completing everyday tasks
  • prevents managers from time wasting on lengthy and tedious tasks
  • is a paperless system

 
Employee Self Service enables employees to manage end to end activities such as core HR, Time and Attendance, Payroll, Talent Management and Recruitment. With KALES, managers may also complete management tasks through Manager Self Service.
 
In the home page of ESS, there are card based designs for each employee. This can be customised so that only the relevant information is shown to the employee. The most commonly used cards in ESS are:
 

 
My Pay: This is where employees have the ability to view their current and past payslips. *XXX* is used for security reasons. Once an employee has viewed their payslip they have the option to either email it or print it.
 
My Timesheet: This is where employees view their work schedule over the week or the month and also clock in (input) their hours worked.
 
My Hire Requisitions: This is where employees can place a quick request for a job. In addition, they may also manage requests and accept/reject candidates.
 
My Leave: This is where employees may request leave, view their past requests and also edit a current request. There is also a function whereby an employee may place a quick request for leave and only fill in basic required information such as end, start date and the reason in a prompt manner.
 
My Expenses: Here an employee can place a request for an expense, view their past requests and edit a current request. Similarly to leave, you can also place a quick request for an expense.
 
My performance: Here employees can view their performance appraisal dates for the year and also complete their performance feedback with a regular journal which is a contemporary method for appraisal, as opposed to a bi annual method.
 
Reviewing these employee self-service features prompts the questions, does your HR system provide this? Does it promote efficiency and effectiveness?
 
Ask us at KALTech for more information or detail on how we can tailor a solution for your organisation to also benefit from these value added features.
 
Louise
KALES Consultant

This entry was posted on March 22nd, 2017.

Is it time for a change?


 
At the end of every year, we hear people talk about their New Year’s resolution(s) – whether it works or not, or is just a fad, it still consumes many conversations and sometimes leaves people in despair when they cannot keep them.
 
New Year’s resolutions for companies may yet be a good thing. I’ve often wondered how companies could benefit, if employees who are empowered to spend company money made a conscious decision to review spending habits, looking for greater returns and benefits for their companies. Imagine if these employees exercised the same (or greater) caution and demanded similar or greater value for money, as they do when spending their own wages/salaries – could it make companies more profitable and less vulnerable to cash flow issues?
 
It would require complete transparency and willingness to celebrate successes (note I used the plural here as I’m hoping there is more than 1 of these), admit failures or shortcomings and to objectively look at spending patterns and habits. What would they do differently, having the benefit of the 2016 learnings? Should they stick with existing relationships or forge new ones? Should they seek a better return on investment (ROI) or accept the returns of 2016 whether good or bad? Would they be bold and brave enough to admit that some spends did not realise the expected ROI.
 
Now I’m not expecting employees to eagerly put their hands up and say that they ‘wasted’ or ‘badly used’ company money (I do not doubt there are many honest employees). 2016 saw many failed projects, many projects overrunning budgets and some projects even being cancelled or restarted. I know of many companies that were brave enough to suspend projects and write off their ‘investments’ in favour of a replacement project that was delivered quicker and for less money than the cancelled project.
 

 
Company money is like any other asset, when it’s used wisely it brings benefits, but when it’s not, it can be regarded as negligence. So, while 2016 may have raised many conversations between interacting parties (suppliers, companies, employees), will companies settle for ’same old same old’ or will they actively look to increase profitability via change? The old adage ‘Better the Devil you know’ comes to mind – but who wants to work with the devil? I know there are ‘angels’ out there that just have to be found. My consulting colleagues’ talk of projects that required clean-up or rescuing and we have done a few of these activities in 2016. This ultimately costs companies more – and not just financially.
 
So as you start 2017, maybe this IS a good time to:
 

  • Review past business relationships and their ROI
  • Consider changing relationships for better ROI
  • Look at future spend and decide to go wider in sourcing
  • Seek advice from peers and competitors (if they will share it)
  • Read more informative material to help make the right decisions
  • Look at engaging ‘help/advisory’ services to ensure projects are delivered well

 
Whatever 2017 holds, every employee has a moral obligation to treat company assets as their own and to aggressively seek the best ROI on spend. As I reflect on 2016, I can certainly see areas where I can do things differently.
 
Question is: Am I going to act on them sooner rather than later or not at all?
 
Calvin
KALTech CEO

This entry was posted on January 12th, 2017.

Fatigue management in the workplace

Fatigue management is a vital area that businesses need to manage. Its importance must be highlighted as it is not often recognised. Fatigue can be a major source of stress among employees and fatigue can significantly affect an employee’s capacity to function. It can affect an employee’s performance, productivity and has detrimental effects on an employee’s mental health. In addition, it increases the potential for workplace injuries to occur.
 
What is Fatigue?
Fatigue is an acute and/or ongoing state of tiredness that leads to mental or physical exhaustion and prevents people from functioning within normal boundaries. Working long hours with intense mental or physical effort or during some or all of the natural time for sleep, can cause fatigue. All of these have obvious implications for workplace and public safety. Fatigue can also have long-term effects on health.
 

 
Why Fatigue is important to manage?
 
Fatigue can have catastrophic impacts, especially at work. In environments where alertness is necessary, safety can be compromised due to errors, increasing the propensity for accidents and having staff suffer worse injuries. This is especially true for vocations where skill and alertness are important. Machine operators, vehicle operators, work demanding high levels of concentration or working odd shifts or times, are some examples of why fatigue management is necessary.
 
Its effect can be far-reaching, but there may also be short-term impacts. Some long term impacts may include:
 

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Heart problems
  • Hypertension
  • Diabetes

 
Fatigue Management
 
There must be a conscious effort to manage fatigue. Companies have a responsibility to their staff to ensure that they don’t cause or act in ways that cause fatigue. While fatigue affects a person’s health, increases the occurrence of workplace injuries, and reduces performance and productivity within the workplace, it can also adversely impact families.
 
The Factors Contributing To Fatigue

  • The mental and physical demands of work
  • Work scheduling and planning
  • Working time
  • Environmental conditions
  • Personal factors

 
Causes of Fatigue
 
Below is a sample list of what causes fatigue.
 

 
Risk-Assessment Methods
 
The following are examples of risk-assessment methods:

  • Consulting workers on workloads and schedules – ask if they are having or have experienced work-related fatigue
  • Analysing an audit of working hours and ensure this includes comparing planned working hours with hours actually worked. Where appropriate, related issues to consider in the audit may include work-related travel and work completed outside of normal hours (e.g. when people take work home)

 
In an organisation, employees are our most valuable assets. Therefore, we must ensure that their health and safety is managed. Fatigue cannot be cured, however there are steps in place to prevent it. A risk management approach to fatigue not only prevents fatigue but helps managers and employees better understand it. Educating and training employees about fatigue and the risks associated with them is essential.
At KALTech Group we have solutions to assist with the effective management of fatigue. Talk to us about our HCM and OH&S solutions to experience the KALTech Difference!
 
During this festive season we all get some well-deserved time off to relax and enjoy quality time with family and friends. These breaks whilst exciting, are essential in ensuring we have time to rest and relax, thereby also contributing to the management of fatigue.
 

 
Louise
KALES Consultant

This entry was posted on December 20th, 2016.

New Fiori Style Homepage

As SuccessFactors continues to evolve, enhancements to the UX are released and made available to SuccessFactors instances globally. One of the most visible pages is the home page. This is the default ‘dashboard’ that customers will see when they login to SuccessFactors, although the default page can be changed to better suit a user’s requirement.
 
Being a page of such high visibility it is great that the new Fiori style template can be used to enhance the user experience of the homepage. It’s a design that mimics the windows 8 and 10 ‘metro’ user interface. Something that many users will be familiar with. It replaces the old tile based design (pictured below).
 
An example of the standard SFSF homepage

An example of the standard SFSF homepage

 
The new Fiori style homepage

The new Fiori style homepage

 
Like the standard homepage, tiles can be moved by the user to customise the position and accessibility of the homepage. A new ‘personalize homepage’ option has been added to the menu and only displays when the user is on the home page. This allows the user to have greater control over their home page. Everything is customised via a drag and drop menu making it easy for users to personalise their experience without any formal training. Easy to use interfaces usually drive up user adoption so this is a positive aspect. Users can also pin or unpin tiles to their home page – essentially turning them on or off as desired.
 
Users can pin and unpin tiles to personalise their home page experience

Users can pin and unpin tiles to personalise their home page experience

 
As normal, an administrator can add custom tiles and personalise the default layout for users. Just as before an editor function is still provided so companies like KALTech who are skilled in HTML can make these tiles completely unique to every customer with the addition of youtube videos, pictures, links, colour schemes and more. Would you like your employees to have a link on their home page to company policies or portals? This is easily achieved now.
 
The ‘Manage Home Page’ screen enables admins to customise the content of the home page for the company.

The ‘Manage Home Page’ screen enables admins to customise the content of the home page for the company.

 
This new ‘Manage Home Page’ user interface makes things simpler for admins and consultants.
 
Overall I feel the new Fiorised home page is a definite improvement. However there are some downsides to the new look. For example, to click on a link on the old homepage it was just one simple click. Now you need to first click on the links tile and then click the appropriate link. I also believe there is a little more wasted space as the ‘ToDo’ section takes up space especially when only a single tile is being utilised. These are minor issues to me and I feel that the new look is still better over the old look and feel. This new home page is also much easier to edit and change.
 
The Fiori look is also starting to be utilised in other modules. Eventually the entire SuccessFactors UI will become unified providing even easier adoption by users. This is something I certainly am looking forward to.
 
What do you think about the new look and feel? Leave a comment below on your thoughts and experience.
 
Ben
SuccessFactors Consultant

This entry was posted on December 9th, 2016.